Kids With ADHD Less Able to Process Emotions During Sleep: Study

WEDNESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) — Parts of the brain thought to support consolidation of emotional memories during sleep are less active in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a new study.

This deficit in sleep-related emotional processing may worsen the emotional problems of children with this condition, researchers in Germany report.

Children with ADHD have difficulty sustaining attention, and often display hyperactivity and impulsive behavior. The neurobehavioral disorder affects 3 percent to 5 percent of U.S. children, more of them boys than girls.

For the study, published May 29 in the journal PLOS ONE, children with ADHD were shown pictures that evoked emotion, such as a scary animal, before they went to bed. They also viewed neutral pictures, such an image of an umbrella or lamp. Their brain activity was then monitored as they slept. When the kids woke up the next morning, the researchers also tested them about what they remembered. The same process was repeated with healthy children and adults.

Read report at Health.com...

Source of the report: 
Health